Captain's Cabin

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Monday, December 29, 2008

Myth Monday - Kwanzaa

I have been asked, "What is Kwanzaa?", and so I will tell you.

Kwanzaa is a week-long holiday honoring African heritage, marked by participants lighting a kinara (candle holder). It is observed from December 26 to January 1 each year.

Kwanzaa,collage


Kwanzaa - called the Black Candle - consists of seven days of celebration, featuring activities such as candle-lighting and pouring of libations, and culminating in a feast and gift giving. It was created by Ron Karenga and was first celebrated from December 26, 1966, to January 1, 1967.

An African-American scholar, social activist, and convicted felon, Ron Karenga created Kwanzaa in 1966 as the first African-American holiday. Karenga said his goal was to "...give Blacks an alternative to the existing holiday and give Blacks an opportunity to celebrate themselves and history, rather than simply imitate the practice of the dominant society."

The name Kwanzaa derives from the Swahili phrase "matunda ya kwanza", meaning "first fruits". The choice of Swahili, an East African language, reflects its status as a symbol of Pan-Africanism, especially in the 1960s.

Kwanzaa is a celebration that has its roots in the black nationalist movement of the 1960s, and was established as a means to help African Americans reconnect with their African cultural and historical heritage by uniting in meditation and study of "African traditions" and "common humanist principles."

The first Kwanzaa stamp was issued by the United States Postal Service on October 22, 1997 at the Natural History Museum in Los Angeles, California. In 2004 a second Kwanzaa stamp, created by artist Daniel Minter was issued which has seven figures in colorful robes symbolizing the seven principles.

The origins of Kwanzaa are not secret and are openly acknowledged by those promoting the holiday. Many Christian and Jewish African-Americans who celebrate Kwanzaa do so in addition to observing Christmas and Hanukkah.

Kwanzaa celebrates what its founder called "The Seven Principles of Kwanzaa," or Nguzo Saba (originally Nguzu Saba - "The Seven Principles of Blackness"), which Karenga said "is a communitarian African philosophy" consisting of what Karenga called "the best of African thought and practice in constant exchange with the world." These seven principles comprise Kawaida, a Swahili term for tradition and reason. Each of the seven days of Kwanzaa is dedicated to one of the following principles, as follows:

· Umoja (Unity) To strive for and to maintain unity in the family, community, nation and race.
· Kujichagulia (Self-Determination) To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves and speak for ourselves.
· Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility) To build and maintain our community together and make our brothers' and sisters' problems our problems and to solve them together.
· Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics) To build and maintain our own stores, shops and other businesses and to profit from them together.
· Nia (Purpose) To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.
· Kuumba (Creativity) To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.
· Imani (Faith) To believe with all our heart in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

Families celebrating Kwanzaa decorate their households with objects of art, colorful African cloth, especially the wearing of the Uwole by women, and fresh fruits that represent African idealism. It is customary to include children in Kwanzaa ceremonies and to give respect and gratitude to ancestors. Libations are shared, generally with a common chalice, "Kikombe cha Umoja" passed around to all celebrants. Non-African Americans also celebrate Kwanzaa. The holiday greeting is "Joyous Kwanzaa."

A Kwanzaa ceremony may include drumming and musical selections, libations, a reading of the "African Pledge" and the Principles of Blackness, reflection on the Pan-African colors, a discussion of the African principle of the day or a chapter in African history, a candle-lighting ritual, artistic performance, and, finally, a feast (Karamu). The greeting for each day of Kwanzaa is "Habari Gani," which is Swahili for "What's the News?"

At first, observers of Kwanzaa eschewed the mixing of the holiday or its symbols, values and practice with other holidays. They felt that doing so would violate the principle of kujichagulia (self-determination) and thus violate the integrity of the holiday, which is partially intended as a reclamation of important African values. Today, many African-American families celebrate Kwanzaa along with Christmas and New Year's. Frequently, both Christmas trees and kinaras, the traditional candle holder symbolic of African-American roots, share space in Kwanzaa celebrating households. To them, Kwanzaa is an opportunity to incorporate elements of their particular ethnic heritage into holiday observances and celebrations of Christmas.

Cultural exhibitions include "The Spirit of Kwanzaa," an annual celebration held at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts featuring interpretive dance, African dance, song and poetry.

You can find out more about Kwanzaa at The Official Kwanzaa Web Site, which includes information on the Seven Principles, Greetings, Gifts, Colors and Decorations, and the Celebration of the Holiday.

8 comments:

The OP Pack said...

That was a very informative explanation of another wonderful holiday. We have neighbors who celebrate Kwanzaa and it is nice to understand its background.

Beautiful picture too.

Woos, the OP Pack

Sweet Praline said...

That was very interesting. I didn't realize it began in the 60s; I thought it was an ancient holiday.

The Island Cats said...

Thanks for that lesson on Kwanzaa!

catsynth said...

That is a very well written history of Kwanzaa.

It is interesting to have a ritualistic holiday whose origins are so recent and not shrouded in myth.

Khyra The Siberian Husky said...

Tank woo fur the informative post -

It is always furry khool to read about other khustoms and khultures -

Hugz&Khysses,
Khyra

Eduardo said...

Wow! I had no idea Kwanzaa lasted 7days! Actually I didn't know none of that! Thanks for the info! Your one smart cookie Diamond, & I'm learning more & more by visiting your blog!
Hugs & Snugs
Eduardo the Snuggle Puggle

Evie/VampyVictor said...

hehhe we had never heard of it before but we do not have very many Africans here.. hehe
We thoughts it was somethign one yelled before they Karate chopped someboddie! hehe

V-V

Lacy said...

w00f's Diamond, us new what Kwanzaa wuz, but glad u explained it fur us..one thing about DWB, we learn other people and their heritage...me shure hopes T-13 will not stop now..me always wuz very excited to c what u did that week..mayb u cood call it Diamond-13...

b safe,
~rocky~