Captain's Cabin

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Monday, December 22, 2008

Myth Monday: Santa Claus

Santa and Mrs. Claus on a Magikal winter evening


Saint Nicholas is the common name for Nicholas of Myra, a saint and Bishop of Myra (in Lycia, part of modern-day Turkey). Because of the many miracles attributed to his intercession, he is also known as Nicholas the Wonderworker. He had a reputation for secret gift-giving, such as putting coins in the shoes of those who left them out for him, and thus became the model for Santa Claus, whose English name comes from the Dutch Sinterklaas. His reputation evolved among the faithful, as is common for early Christian saints. In 1087, his relics were furtively translated to Bari, in southern Italy; for this reason, he is also known as Nicholas of Bari.

The historical Saint Nicholas is remembered and revered among Catholic and Orthodox Christians. He is also honored by various Anglican and Lutheran churches. Saint Nicholas is the patron saint of sailors, merchants, archers, and children, and students in Greece, Belgium, Romania, Bulgaria, Georgia, Russia, the Republic of Macedonia, Slovakia, Serbia and Montenegro. He is also the patron saint of Barranquilla, Bari, Amsterdam, Beit Jala, and Liverpool. In 1809, the New-York Historical Society convened and retroactively named Sancte Claus the patron saint of Nieuw Amsterdam, the Dutch name for New York City. He was also a patron of the Varangian Guard of the Byzantine emperors, who protected his relics in Bari.

Of the many deeds and miracles attributed to him, his most famous exploit involved a poor man had three daughters but could not afford a proper dowry for them. This meant that they would remain unmarried and probably, in absence of any other possible employment would have to become prostitutes. Hearing of the poor man's plight, Nicholas decided to help him but being too modest to help the man in public, (or to save the man the humiliation of accepting charity), he went to his house under the cover of night and threw three purses (one for each daughter) filled with gold coins through the window opening into the man's house.

One version has him throwing one purse for three consecutive nights. Another has him throw the purses over a period of three years, each time the night before one of the daughters comes "of age". Invariably, the third time the father lies in wait, trying to discover the identity of their benefactor. In one version the father confronts the saint, only to have Saint Nicholas say it is not him he should thank, but God alone. In another version, Nicholas learns of the poor man's plan and drops the third bag down the chimney instead; a variant holds that the daughter had washed her stockings that evening and hung them over the embers to dry, and that the bag of gold fell into the stocking.

For his help to the poor, Nicholas is the patron saint of pawnbrokers; the three gold balls traditionally hung outside a pawnshop symbolize the three sacks of gold. People then began to suspect that he was behind a large number of other anonymous gifts to the poor, using the inheritance from his wealthy parents. After he died, people in the region continued to give to the poor anonymously, and such gifts were still often attributed to St. Nicholas.

A nearly identical story is attributed by Greek folklore to Basil of Caesarea. Basil's feast day on January 1 is considered the time of exchanging gifts in Greece.

Today, Saint Nicholas is still celebrated as a great gift-giver in several Western European countries. According to one source, medieval nuns used the night of December 6th to anonymously deposit baskets of food and clothes at the doorsteps of the needy. According to another source, on December 6th every sailor or ex-sailor of the Low Countries (which at that time was virtually all of the male population) would descend to the harbor towns to participate in a church celebration for their patron saint. On the way back they would stop at one of the various Nicholas fairs to buy some hard-to-come-by goods, gifts for their loved ones and invariably some little presents for their children. While the real gifts would only be presented at Christmas, the little presents for the children were given right away, courtesy of Saint Nicholas. This and his miracle of him resurrecting the three butchered children, made Saint Nicholas a patron saint of children and later students as well.

St. Nicholas Day, usually held on the 6th of December, is a festival for children in many countries in Europe. The American tradition of Santa Claus as well as the Anglo-Canadian and British Father Christmas, derive from these legends. The name of course is derived from the Dutch Sinterklaas.

Over time, the relationship has become muddied and some American cities with strong German influences such as Milwaukee, Cincinnati and St. Louis continue to celebrate St. Nick's Day on a scale similar to the German Custom. (Dragonheart wrote about German Christmas customs on his blog last year.) On the previous night, children put one empty shoe (or sock) outside, and, on the following morning of December 6, the children awake to find that St. Nick has filled their previously empty footwear with candy and small presents (if the children have been "good") or coal (if not). For these children, the relationship between St. Nick and Santa Claus is not clearly defined, although St. Nick is usually explained to be a helper of Santa.

St. Nicholas (San Nicola) is the patron of the city of Bari, where he is buried. Its deeply felt celebration is called the Festa di San Nicola, held on the 7-8-9 of May. In particular on May 8 the relics of the saint are carried on a boat on the sea in front of the city with many boats following (Festa a mare). On December 6 there is a ritual called the Rito delle nubili. The same tradition is currently observed in Sassari, where during the day of Saint Nicholas, patron of the city, gifts are given to young brides who need help before getting married.

9 comments:

-d ma said...

i didn't realize santa kept women out of prostitution.

Eduardo said...

*Eduardo tells Mommy angryly* Thanks for the lies Miss Fairy Tales! Santa Paws doesn't come on December 25th he comes on Dec 9th! I want my presents now Mommy!*Eduardo tells Diamond thankfully*
Thank you Diamond for all that info on Santa Paws, that's neat how he helped that poor man keep his daughters out of prostitution. Also I want my Mommy to give me my presents!
Hugs & Snugs
Eduardo the Snuggle Puggle

Tybalt said...

Wow! That's a whole lot of information on Sandy Paws . . . I knew he was great, but I didn't realize he was SO great! Thanks, Diamond!

Jewelgirl said...

Sandy Paws rules!

meemsnyc said...

Wow, thanks for the Santa info! We never knew that before! It's a great history lesson.

The OP Pack said...

You always have such interesting stories to share. We loved hearing about Santa Claus.

Happy Holidays to all of woo there from all of us.

Woos, the OP Pack

Mickey,Georgia , Tillie said...

As always, a wonderfully informative post :) WE enjoyed reading all about the origins of Santa Claus !!
Purrs

Khyra The Siberian Husky said...

Wow!

What a khool lesson!

Hugz&Khysses,
Khyra
PeeEssWoo: Tank woo again fur my snow globe!

Evie/VampyVictor said...

Will the real Santy Paws please stand up! :)

V-V